Simple ICBC billing software for B.C. physicians, physiotherapists and chiropractors.

MSP Teleplan serves as an ICBC billing agent for many medical and healthcare occupations. Check if you can enroll.

  • PHYSICIANS

Physicians can use CM to bill ICBC electronically. Learn more.

  • PHYSIOTHERAPISTS

Physiotherapists can use CM to bill ICBC electronically. Learn more.

  • CHIROPRACTORS

Some chiropractors can use CM to bill ICBC electronically. Learn more.

  • OPTOMETRISTS

Optometrists can use CM to bill the Office of the Superintendent of Motor Vehicles (OSMV). Learn more.

  • MASSAGE THERAPISTS

Massage therapists are not allowed to bill ICBC electronically. Learn more.

  • ACUPUNCTURISTS

Acupuncturists are not allowed to bill ICBC electronically. Learn more.

  • PODIATRISTS

Podiatrists are not allowed to bill ICBC electronically.

  • NATUROPATHS

Naturopaths are not allowed to bill ICBC electronically.

  • Best ICBC Billing software


    Claim Manager is the simplest way to bill ICBC and other insurance companies. It integrates electronic billing in your clinic management system and offers custom user interface designed exclusively for your profession.
  • Validation of ICBC claim number


    Automated validation of ICBC claim number is built-in in every ICBC claim. None of your claims will be declined because of invalid claim number, and your payments will arrive sooner.
  • Libraries of ICBC billing codes


    Eliminate room for error by selecting an ICBC billing code from a custom automatically-updated catalog for your profession. ICBC fees are populated automatically.
  • Libraries of diagnostic codes


    Don’t get confused by thousands of diagnostic codes. Easily select a diagnostic code from a small built-in custom library of most popular codes for your profession.

SO SIMPLE

You can do your billing yourself.

Try it today. Limited time offer.

14-DAY FREE TRIAL!

ICBC Billing for Healthcare Practitioners

Read this section if you are a physiotherapist, chiropractor, massage therapist, occupational therapist, acupuncturist, podiatrist, or optometrist. If you are a physician, scroll down.

ICBC Rehabilitation Benefits

Only rehabilitation therapies by healthcare practitioners can be billed to ICBC. Learn if your services qualify as rehabilitative and what it the difference between mandatory and permissive rehabilitation benefits.

According to s. 78 of the Part 7 of Insurance (Vehicle) Regulation (the “REGULATION”), rehabilitation is “the restoration, in the shortest practical time, of an injured person to the highest level of gainful employment or self sufficiency that, allowing for the permanent effects of his injuries is, with medical and vocational assistance, reasonably achievable by him”. Section 88 of the Part 7 of the Regulation divides rehabilitation benefits in either mandatory (ICBC must pay) or permissive (ICBC may pay). Do you know how s.88 applies to your profession?
Mandatory ICBC benefits are defined by s. 88 (1) of Part 7 of the Regulation. Section 88(1) states that ICBC shall “pay as benefits all reasonable expenses incurred by the insured as a result of the injury for necessary medical, surgical, dental, hospital, ambulance or professional nursing services, or for necessary physical therapy, chiropractic treatment, occupational therapy or speech therapy or for prosthesis or orthosis.” Therefore, all listed healthcare therapies are mandatory ICBC benefits as long as they are necessary and reasonable.
Permissive ICBC benefits are listed in s. 88 (2) of the Part 7 of the Regulation. Under s. 88(2) ICBC may pay for treatments that “are likely to promote the rehabilitation” of the injured person. These benefits are referred to as “permissive” because ICBC has discretion as to whether it will pay for the items listed in s. 88(2). Section 88(2) do not list any specific healthcare treatments, such as acupuncture or  massage therapy, but they generally fall under subsection (f) “funds for any other costs the corporation in its sole discretion agrees to pay.” Expenses that help the claimant cope with daily living but do not restore function as defined in s.78, such as attendant care and pain management treatment, do not fall within coverage under Part 7: Uhrovic v. Masjhuri, 2008 BCCA 462; Boota v. Dhaliwal, 2008 BCSC 373, aff’d 2009 BCCA 586.
Expenses that help the claimant cope with daily living but do not restore function as defined in s.78, such as attendant care and pain management treatment, do not fall within coverage under Part 7: Uhrovic v. Masjhuri, 2008 BCCA 462; Boota v. Dhaliwal, 2008 BCSC 373, aff’d 2009 BCCA 586.
Section 88(3) of the Part 7 of the Regulation requires the insured to obtain written approval from ICBC before incurring an expense for a permissive benefit. ICBC may require the insured to submit information necessary to assist in determining entitlement before making a decision. That means that practitioners might need to bill patients directly until they get an approval from ICBC for permissive benefits.
ICBC argued that massage therapy is a treatment that is only payable under s. 88(2)(f) of the REGULATION, which makes it a permissive benefit. However in the important decision RAGUIN V. INSURANCE CORPORATION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA, 2011 BCCA 482(“RAGUIN”), released November 29, 2011, the Court of Appeal concluded that even though s. 88(1) does not mention massage therapy by name, it can be included as a form of “physical therapy”, meaning that where massage therapy treatment is necessary and recommended by a physician ICBC will be obliged to pay the associated reasonable expenses. ICBC seems to have taken this decision to a next level because it states on its web site that it may fund up to 12 massage therapy treatments without a physician referral.
Kinesiology is not listed under Part 7 but has been accepted and paid for as permissive benefit under s.88(2). Following the decision in Raguin, patients might argue that kinesiology shall be considered a mandatory benefit similarly to massage therapy. ICBC requires that a kinesiologist has a Bachelors of Kinesiology and provides one-on-one treatments.  ICBC rate for kinesiologists is $50/hour. Until kinesiology is explicitly recognized as a mandatory benefit, obtaining a physician’s referral and ICBC adjuster’s preliminary approval is strongly recommended.

ICBC Billing Guide

General information about ICBC billing for healthcare practitioners.

ICBC will rarely agree to pay for two or more types of treatment at a time. Ask your patients if they simultaneously undergo another type treatment under ICBC benefits because it may invalidate your ICBC claims.
Section 88 (7) of Part 7 of the REGULATION reads, “The maximum amount payable by the corporation under this section for medical, surgical, dental, nursing or physical therapy services or for chiropractic treatment, occupational therapy or speech therapy listed in the payment schedules established by the Medical Services Commission under the Medicare Protection Act is the amount listed in the payment schedules for that service, treatment or therapy.” Therefore, ICBC reimburses healthcare practitioners at a rate set up in the ICBC Fee Schedule for their profession.
If ICBC claim is confirmed, all fees in ICBC Fee Schedule must be billed to ICBC directly. Practitioners must not bill patients for the ICBC rates. ICBC makes payments to practitioners, not the patients.
Under s.101 of the Regulation, benefits payable under Part 7 shall be paid by ICBC (a) in the case of weekly benefits, within 4 weeks after it receives proof of claim, and thereafter at 4 week intervals if the insured complies with sections 98 and 99 when required by the corporation, and (b) in any other case, within 60 days after it receives proof of claim. By becoming an ICBC supplier a practitioner might get entitled to semimonthly payments.
Under ss.82 and 83 of the Part 7 of of the Regulation, if an insured is eligible for benefits under theWorkers Compensation Act or similar legislation in another jurisdiction or the Employment Insurance Act, that amount is deductible from benefits under Part 7. ICBC is exempt from their obligation to pay even when the insured doesn’t claim from the other source. If the benefits from other sources exceed the amount that the claimant would be entitled to receive under Part 7, ICBC is not obliged to pay Part 7 benefits.
If an MSP premium assistance patients has an ICBC claim, practitioners cannot bill both plans for the same service. They shall only bill ICBC.
If a patient has an extended health insurance policy, ICBC may refuse to pay for the treatments until the patient exhausts the extended coverage. Section 88 (6) of Part 7 of the Regulation reads that ICBC “is not liable for any expenses paid or payable to or recoverable by the insured under a medical, surgical, dental or hospital plan or law, or paid or payable by another insurer.” Fortunately for the patients, ICBC adjusters rarely enforce this condition, so most practitioners can successfully collect ICBC benefits before billing extended insurance plans of their patients.
Under s.98(1) of the Part 7 of the Regulation, ICBC can compel the insured to provide a medical certificate or report as to the nature and prognosis of the injuries in any format it specifies, including an oral or narrative report. ICBC can request a report from either a medical doctor, dentist, physiotherapist or chiropractor.
Only physiotherapists and some chiropractors can use MSP Teleplan to bill ICBC. Other professions need to bill ICBC by other means, often by fax.
Read complete Part 7 of the Insurance (Vehicle) Regulation here.
Only practitioners or clinics/hospitals can be ICBC payees. Patients cannot be designated ICBC payees when their claims submitted by the practitioners.

ICBC Billing and User Fees

Charging patients over the ICBC rate.

Yes, practitioners on fee-for-service payment models are allowed to charge more than stipulated in the ICBC Fee Schedule. Any charges in excess of the ICBC rate are patients’ responsibility. They are often called “user fees”. Practitioners on lump sum payment models, such as the flat fee model for chiropractors, are not allowed to charge their patients directly. Their patients have no out-of-pocket expenses.
Practitioners can bill user fees to patients’ extended insurance plans. If the insurer declines such benefit, practitioners need to bill the patient directly.
ICBC will often reimburse user fees if the patient was not at fault of the accident. Under s. 102, ICBC may, at any time, make a lump sum payment of benefits or otherwise alter the form of payment to benefit the insured. Sometimes, ICBC may agree to reimburse patients’ user fees on a monthly basis. The reimbursement is an advance of a patient’s final settlement or court award. Practitioners are not a party to such transactions. Patients need to negotiate it with ICBC adjusters themselves.

SO SIMPLE

You can do your billing yourself.

Try it today. Limited time offer.

14-DAY FREE TRIAL!

ICBC Billing for Physiotherapists

B.C. physiotherapists can use Claim Manager to bill ICBC by MSP Teleplan.

Physiotherapists are on a fee-for-service billing plan. ICBC will pay for their services at the ICBC rate in accordance with the current ICBC Fee Schedule.
ICBC Payment Schedule for Physiotherapists
  • 09904
  • Initial visit
  • $25.20
  • 09902
  • Subsequent visit
  • $17.65
  • 09933
  • Prolonged visit
  • $23.60
  • 09934
  • Prolonged visit – other
  • $23.60
  • 09935
  • Prolonged visit – CNS
  • $35.90
  • 09908
  • Home visit
  • $28.70
  • 09903
  • 1st add. area
  • $6.75
  • 09913
  • 2nd add. area
  • $6.75
  • 09914
  • 3rd add. area
  • $6.75
Physiotherapists can only bill user fees to their patients. Charges under ICBC Fee Schedule must be billed to ICBC.
ICBC claim number and B.C. Services Card (CareCard) are the only pieces of information that a physiotherapists need to ask a patient before beginning a first treatment.
ICBC web site states that ICBC may fund up to 20 physiotherapy visits before a physician needs to be involved. However, s. 88 (8) of the Part 7 of the Regulation reads, ICBC “is not liable to pay for more than 12 physical therapy treatments for an insured for each accident unless, before any additional treatment is given, the corporation’s medical advisor or the insured’s medical practitioner certifies to the corporation in writing that, in his opinion, the treatment is necessary for the insured.’
If ICBC request that a physiotherapist submit an ICBC Physiotherapy Update form, you can download it  here.
No. Physiotherapists must submit their claims through MSP using MSP Teleplan.
Physiotherapists can use Claim Manager to bill ICBC, extended insurance plans and patients in one transaction. Charges to the extended insurance policies and patients are calculated as remainders after deducting the ICBC rates. If ICBC refuses to pay benefits on the grounds that the insured extended insurance policy is not exhausted yet, physiotherapists can bill the extended plan first.
You can read more about ICBC billing for physiotherapists here.

ICBC Billing for Chiropractors

Some B.C. chiropractors can use Claim Manager to bill ICBC by MSP Teleplan.

Chiropractors can choose between two ICBC payment models: the flat fee and fee for service. Only chiropractors on fee-for-service model can bill ICBC using MSP Teleplan. The flat fee program participants shall bill ICBC by submitting reports for payments by email, fax or mail. For more information about the flat fee program, read here.
Participation in the Flat Fee program is voluntarily. If a patient selects a chiropractor who is a participant of the flat fee program, but either the patient or the chiropractor choose not to participate in the program for that patient treatment, ICBC billing will continue under the fee for service method.
ICBC will pay for the necessary chiropractic treatments in accordance with the current ICBC Fee Schedule.
ICBC Payment Schedule for Chiropractors
  • 00130
  • Initial visit
  • $22.27
  • 00137
  • Subsequent visit
  • $17.35
  • 00136
  • Emergency visit
  • $34.85
  • 00133
  • Home Visit
  • $27.05
  • 09935 – del
  • Prolonged visit – CNS
  • $35.90
  • 09908
  • Home visit
  • $28.70
  • 09903
  • 1st add. area
  • $6.75
  • 09913
  • 2nd add. area
  • $6.75
  • 09914
  • 3rd add. area
  • $6.75
Chiropractors on the flat fee schedule are not allowed to charge their patients directly because there is no user fees. Chiropractors on fee-for-service schedule shall bill rates under the ICBC Fee Schedule to ICBC and user fees to the patients.
ICBC claim number and B.C. Services Card (CareCard) are the only pieces of information that a chiropractor needs to ask a patient before beginning a first treatment. Chiropractors do not need to call ICBC for approval.
No. Chiropractors on the fee-for-service program must submit their claims through MSP using MSP Teleplan.
Chiropractors on the fee-for-service program can use Claim Manager to bill ICBC, extended insurance plans and patients in one transaction. Charges to the extended insurance policies and patients are calculated as remainders after deducting the ICBC rates. If ICBC refuses to pay benefits on the grounds that the insured extended insurance policy is not exhausted yet, chiropractors can bill the extended plan first.
You can read more about ICBC billing for chiropractors here.

ICBC Billing for Massage Therapists

B.C. massage therapists cannot bill ICBC by MSP Teleplan.

Massage therapists need to bill ICBC by faxing their invoice forms to an ICBC claim centre. They cannot use MSP Teleplan to submit their ICBC claims electronically. Read more about ICBC invoicing here.
ICBC funds $23 per visit plus tax.
Even though a physician referral is generally required, ICBC web site reads that “ICBC may fund up to 12 treatments before a physician needs to be involved.”
A massage therapist needs to obtain a supplier number from ICBC to bill ICBC directly. A customer’s claim number and BC Services Card are also required to begin treatment.
Massage therapists enrolled into ICBC supplier system receive payments and payment reports every two weeks.
Find more about ICBC billing for massage therapy on the ICBC web site.
Yes, ICBC benefits for massage therapy services are subject to GST. GST is applied to both the amount submitted to ICBC and the user fee billed to the patient.

ICBC Billing for Occupational Therapists

B.C. occupational therapists cannot bill ICBC by MSP Teleplan.

Only occupational therapists who sign an annual participation agreement with ICBC and were placed on approved list of ICBC service providers can bill ICBC directly.
All information about ICBC billing for occupational therapists is available in the Performance Standards for Approved Occupational Therapists guide.
An occupational therapist needs to obtain a supplier number from ICBC to bill ICBC directly. A customer’s claim number and BC Services Card are also required to begin treatment.
Occupational therapists enrolled into ICBC supplier system receive payments and payment reports every two weeks.
Find more about ICBC billing for occupational therapy on the ICBC web site.

ICBC Billing for Acupuncturists

Acupuncturists are not listed among ICBC business partners in health services and are not eligible to bill ICBC electronically by MSP Teleplan. Please contact the ICBC adjudicator of the patient to learn if your services qualify as permissive benefits on case by case basis. The ICBC adjudicator will explain you the billing process outside of MSP Teleplan if applicable.

 

SO SIMPLE

You can do your billing yourself.

Try it today. Limited time offer.

14-DAY FREE TRIAL!

ICBC Billing for Physicians

B.C. Physicians can bill ICBC using MSP Teleplan.

Under s.88(7) of the Regulation, there is no specific ICBC Fee Schedule for physicians. Physicians shall use MSP Fee Schedule for their profession to bill ICBC.
ICBC billing is similar to MSP billing. The only difference is that ICBC claims require an ICBC claim number. The claim format, the catalogs for fee item codes and diagnostic codes are the same.
Physicians receive their ICBC payments twice a month, along with their MSP payments.
Initially ICBC benefits are paid to physicians by MSP, but eventually ICBC reimburses MSP for all amounts paid out for injuries sustained in MVAs.
All cases directly relating to an MVA which ICBC Insurance coverage applies should be billed to ICBC regardless of whether seen in an office visit, emergency, lab or x-ray facility. Surgery or procedures performed in regard to these cases should also be billed to ICBC. Medical Practitioners are accountable for proper MVA identification and are subject to audit.
In cases where a visit or procedure was occasioned by more than one condition, the dominant purpose must be related to an MVA to code it as such. If the MVA is work-related, WorkSafeBC (WSBC) should be billed under their procedures.
If the patient is from another province, use the normal out-of-province billing process.
In those instances in which the patient has no MSP coverage, the medical practitioner should bill the patient or ICBC directly. Medical practitioners have the choice of either billing the uninsured patient directly at the BCMA recommended rate and having the patient recover the costs from ICBC (see BCMA Guide to Fees), or billing ICBC for the MSP amount.

ICBC Contacts

medinquiries@icbc.com
1-800-663-3051 604-661-2800 Monday to Friday: 8:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. Saturday: 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Find a closest ICBC claim centre here.

SO SIMPLE

You can do your billing yourself.

Try it today. Limited time offer.

14-DAY FREE TRIAL!